Results indicate that 78% of the 340 sample respondents are sober and substance abuse free, after participating in the ATC program. While the entire sample indicated high levels of sobriety, those who remained at ATC as staff or interns were less likely to use the legal substances of alcohol and marijuana than graduates who were not at ATC. Further, on average ATC graduates self-report that they are engaging in spiritual practices such as praying, reading the Bible and attending church, at least on a weekly basis. However, individuals who were sober were far more engaged in spiritual practices, experienced a greater connection to God, higher levels of self-acceptance and love of others. Overall, sample respondents reported increased holistic health indicators in multiple dimensions, following their graduation from an ATC program. Finally the data indicates overwhelming satisfaction in the ATC program. View Study Results

  • 92.9% reported NO new legal problems post-graduation

  • 25.9% have enrolled in new education or training

  • 91% reported improved quality of relationships with family members

  • Respondents who met ATC’s definition of sobriety reported a greater connection with God as compared to those who were categorized as non-sober.

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Conducted annually, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) provides nationally representative data on the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs; substance use disorders; mental health issues; and receipt of substance use and mental health treatment among the civilian, noninstitutionalized population aged 12 or older in the United States. NSDUH estimates allow researchers, clinicians, policymakers, and the general public to better understand and improve the nation’s behavioral health. These reports and detailed tables present estimates from the 2022 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH).

Alcohol Use

Among people aged 12 to 20 in 2022, 15.1% (or 5.8 million people) were past month alcohol users. Estimates of binge alcohol use and heavy alcohol use in the past month among underage people were 8.2% (or 3.2 million people) and 1.7% (or 646,000 people), respectively.

Illicit Drug Use

In 2022, marijuana was the most commonly used illicit drug, with 22.0% of people aged 12 or older (or 61.9 million people) using it in the past year. The percentage was highest among young adults aged 18 to 25 (38.2% or 13.3 million people), followed by adults aged 26 or older (20.6% or 45.7 million people), then by adolescents aged 12 to 17 (11.5% or 2.9 million people).

Among people aged 12 or older in 2022, 3.2% (or 8.9 million people) misused opioids (heroin or prescription pain relievers) in the past year. Among the 8.9 million people who misused opioids in the past year, 8.5 million people misused prescription pain relievers compared with 1.0 million people who used heroin. These numbers include 587,000 people who both misused prescription pain relievers and used heroin in the past year.

Mental Illness & Treatment

Among adults aged 18 or older in 2022, 23.1% (or 59.3 million people) had any mental illness (AMI) in the past year. The percentage of adults aged 18 or older with AMI in the past year was highest among young adults aged 18 to 25 (36.2% or 12.6 million people), followed by adults aged 26 to 49 (29.4% or 30.2 million people), then by adults aged 50 or older (13.9% or 16.5 million people).

Among adults aged 18 or older in 2022, those with SMI or AMI in the past year were more likely than those without mental illness in the past year to have been past year users of illicit drugs overall. An estimated 52.9% of adults aged 18 or older with SMI and 43.9% of adults aged 18 or older with AMI used illicit drugs in the past year compared with 20.6% of adults aged 18 or older with no mental illness.

In 2022, people aged 12 or older were classified as having received mental health treatment in the past year if they received professional counseling, medication, or other treatment for their mental health in an inpatient  location; in an outpatient location; via telehealth; or in a prison, jail, or juvenile detention center, or they took prescribed medication in the past year to help with their mental health. Support services from a support group or from a peer support specialist or recovery coach, or services in an emergency room or department were not classified as mental health treatment.

Substance Use Treatment

In 2022, people aged 12 or older who used alcohol or drugs in their lifetime were classified as having received substance use treatment in the past year if they received treatment in an inpatient location; in an outpatient location; via telehealth; or in a prison, jail, or juvenile detention center. Support services from a support group or from a peer support specialist or recovery coach, services in an emergency room or department, or detoxification or withdrawal support services were not classified as substance use treatment.

People were classified as needing substance use treatment in the past year if they had an SUD or received substance use treatment in the past year. Among people aged 12 or older in 2022 who were classified as needing substance use treatment in the past year, about 1 in 4 (24.0% or 13.1 million people) received substance use treatment in the past year.

Perceived Recovery

In 2022, 30.1 million adults aged 18 or older (or 11.8%) perceived that they ever had a substance use problem. Among these adults, 71.0% (or 21.3 million people) considered themselves to be in recovery or to have recovered.

In 2022, 62.3 million adults aged 18 or older (or 24.5%) perceived that they ever had a mental health issue. Among these adults, 65.8% (or 40.8 million people) considered themselves to be in recovery or to have recovered.

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